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dc.contributor.authorShields, Mark A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-04T08:47:56Z
dc.date.available2016-08-04T08:47:56Z
dc.date.issued2012-10
dc.identifier.issn0040-165X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10679/4434
dc.identifier.urihttps://muse.jhu.edu/article/490734
dc.description.abstractMore than twenty-five years ago social theorist Randall Collins aptly pointed out that technology was one of sociology’s “unexplored dark spots.” Had he then perused the pages of Technology and Culture, he could have noted that usable social theory was largely missing from the history of technology as well. Since then many historians of technology have embraced one quite-specific theoretical framework—social constructivism—and shown some openness to other perspectives as well. Despite lingering skepticism about its utility, SCOT has enriched the narrative and analytical range of scholarship in the field. At the same time, however, social theorists have shown no remotely comparable opening to the history of technology. As far as social theory goes, the history of technology is a dark hole.
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University Press
dc.relation.ispartofTechnology and Culture
dc.rightsrestrictedAccess
dc.titleTechnology and social theoryen_US
dc.typeReviewen_US
dc.peerreviewedyes
dc.publicationstatuspublisheden_US
dc.contributor.departmentÖzyeğin University
dc.contributor.ozuauthorShields, Mark A.
dc.identifier.volume53
dc.identifier.issue4
dc.identifier.startpage918
dc.identifier.endpage920
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000311003100008
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/tech.2012.0130


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